Fumaric AcidFumaricacid

Use of Fumaric Acid in the treatment of psoriasis

Fumaric acid is one of the organic acids in the Krebs cycle known to metabolize fats, carbohydrates and proteins. For a long time, this acid has been used in treating psoriasis. Some studies have shown Fumaric acid to be highly effective in treating psoriasis even at this advanced stage of the disease 3.

Several recent studies confirm past research on fumaric acid’s ability to support skin health. In a study published by the British Journal of Dermatology, the researchers analyzed the records of patients who had received fumaric acid for severe psoriasis, either alone or combined with other systemic medications.

Of 12 patients treated with fumaric acid, 11 patients experienced an improvement in psoriasis after starting fumaric acid. Nine patients received fumaric acid in combination with other systemic therapies including cyclosporin, acitretin, hydroxyurea and methotrexate. Seven of the patients were able to reduce the dosage of the pharmaceuticals while taking fumaric acid. In two patients, severe psoriasis was controlled using fumaric acid alone.

The researchers concluded, “Fumaric acid appears effective and less toxic than other systemic treatments for psoriasis. Fumaric acid esters were used successfully in combination with other systemic agents and generally enabled the doses of the more hazardous drugs to be reduced.”

Studies have also been made for the effectiveness of fumaric acid esters, in particular dimethylfumarate (DMF), in the treatment of moderate to severe plaque psoriasis intolerant and/or resistant to other conventional systemic therapies. The findings suggest that [the fumaric acid ester] dimethylfumarate is a safe, effective and well-tolerated long-term oral treatment worthy of consideration for selective patients.

Side effects of the use of Fumaric acid, mostly mild, consisted of flushing (55 percent), diarrhea (42 percent), nausea (14 percent), tiredness (14 percent) and stomach complaints (12 percent). Lymphocytopenia (a deficiency of lymphocytes in the blood) has also been observed in quite a few patients during therapy with fumaric acid esters.

How is maleic acid converted to fumaric acid?

Maleic acid is quite different from Fumaric acid in a considerable number of ways. Here are some ways in which Maleic acid differs from Fumaric acid: Maleic acid is a less stable molecule than fumaric acid. The difference in heat of combustion is 22.7 kJ·mol−1. Maleic acid is more soluble in water, than fumaric acid. The … Continue reading